16- 25 Youth Group, Tuesday 21st of October: New venue!

This is just a reminder that the 16-25 youth group is no longer based at the Tavistock Centre or at Central School of Speech and Drama. 

For the next few months at least,  the new home for the 16-25 youth group is The Underground centre in Holloway, Islington. 

 
Tomorrow evening, Lee Gale will be outside Holloway Road underground station at 6pm to meet everyone. The group will make its way to The Underground Centre at 6.15 pm.

 If you come after that time, please follow the directions below to The Underground Centre:
  • Exit Holloway Road underground station and turn right
  • Start walking down Holloway Road towards Highbury & Islington
  • Take the third road on your right -  George’s Road 
  • Walk to the end of George’s Road
  • At the end of George’s Road, turn right (on to Lough Road)
  • On your left there should be an estate. You will soon come to a basket ball court
  • The Underground Centre is to the left of the basketball court 
image

For the first meeting, there will be no steering group! 

In case you get lost on the day, call 07540261104. 

To recap:

Date: Tuesday 21st of October
The group will take place at: The Underground Centre, Piper Close, London, N7 8TQ
Time: 6.30 pm - 8.30 pm 

**Lee Gale will be outside Holloway Road Underground station at 6pm**
(It’s on the Piccadilly line) 

irreverent-dance:

thetestshot:

The Test Shot presents Irreverent Dance, an innovative, body positive and LGBT-friendly dance project based in London.  Founded by Amanda Jones in 2012, Irreverent Dance has brought a range of dance styles to the lives of adults who “don’t know their bar from their barre”. The Test Shot spent a morning with Irreverent Dance, talking about gender roles in ballet and the ways in which the class seeks to subvert them. Irreverent Dance aims to create a space for people of all genders, ethnicities and body shapes to learn to dance without pressure from society’s expectations of how our bodies should be. 

Thanks so much to the Test Shot for making this amazing videofeaturing reasons why our students love to dance with Irreverent Dance.

Our Kickstarter is nearly 20% funded - if you’re able to give a little, do!

Support Irreverent Dance to open the first gender-neutral dance studio in Europe!  They are already almost 1/3 of the way there. 

Call for trans people who might be interested in being mentors at AKT

The Albert Kennedy Trust, an organisation that helps young LGBT people who are homeless or at risk of homelessness, are currently recruiting new mentors - LGBT people over 25 who can commit an hour every week or two to meet with a young LGBT person and act as a mentor – to support, listen, and help them meet their goals.

They are strongly encouraging applications from trans people. The deadline is the 23rd October and you must be available on the 25th October  for a recruitment day.

For details on the role please see this document: http://www.akt.org.uk/webtop/modules/_repository/documents/Mentors.docx

The application form is available to download here: http://www.akt.org.uk/webtop/modules/_repository/documents/MentorApplication2014-15.docx

Information on all our available volunteer roles is available here: http://www.akt.org.uk/2/spg523/albert_kennedy_trust_-_helping_young_lgbt_people/can_you_help/volunteers/volunteer_roles.aspx

Stop Our Silence - 24hour sponsored silence - JOIN IN!

#StopOurSilence

Stop Our Silence: Take part in a sponsored silence for Gendered Intelligence


Gendered Intelligence is asking you to stay silent for 24 hours to raise money and raise awareness of gender-based bullying.

We know it sounds like a long time, but your silence sends out a powerful message that bullying someone because of their gender identity or presentation is never okay. 

During Anti-Bullying Week 2014 (17th - 21st of November), Gendered Intelligence is looking for 100 people to take part in our sponsored silence campaign called Stop Our Silence.

We want those 100 people to raise £100.

YOU CAN DO THIS AMAZING ACT - AFTER ALL IT’S JUST ONE DAY!


You can take part in Stop Our Silence by volunteering not to say a single word for 24 hours between the 17th and 23rd of November. Before that date, you can collect sponsorship money from your friends and family either in person or by asking them to donate online.


We want to ERASE transphobic and gender-based bullying because we know first hand the effects that it has on the lives of young trans people.

Bullying takes away your right to feel safe at school, college or University. 

So many young trans, gender non-conforming and questioning young people face bullying at school, college and University– reports suggest that the figure could be as high as 70% (Source: UK Home Office Report, 2011)


Bullying does not only mean physical violence. It can also take the form of teasing, swearing, name-calling, making threats, phone calls and sending cruel, manipulative or threatening messages online. 

Gender-based bullying does not only affect young trans people. Homophobic insults are often about policing gender expression. They are used against anyone who is seen as “too feminine” or “too masculine”. People are the target of anti-gay bullying not because they are out or because they are in a relationship with someone - but because of people think they do not fit into gender roles properly.


In short, gender-based bullying prevents people from being themselves. 


How to take part

To take part in Stop Our Silence, follow these simple steps:

  1. Register on the website 
  2. Print out a paper form to record your sponsorship. You can find ithere.
  3. Ask your sponsors to give you the money in person, or they can donate through our fundraising website .
  4. Ask your sponsors to fill in this online form so we can follow who is sponsoring who!  
Beatrix Campbell: End of Equality

Beatrix Campbell: End of Equality


Has neoliberalism destroyed gender inequality?


http://iai.tv/iai-academy/courses/info?course=end-of-equality

October Youth Sessions at GI


16 - 25 Youth Group in London: Change of Date! 

We are really sorry for the confusion, but the 16 -25 youth group will now run on the 3rd Tuesday of the month instead of the second. We had some issues with room allocations so we have had to move the day of the youth group. 

The new home for the 16-25 youth group is The Underground centre in Holloway, Islington. 

The dates for upcoming sessions are:

 

Tuesday, 21st of October (21/10/2014)
Tuesday, 18th of November (18/11/2014)
Tuesday, 16th of December (16/12/2014)
 
For the group on Tuesday 21st of October, Lee Gale will be outside Holloway Road underground station at 6pm to meet everyone. The group will make its way to The Underground Centre at 6.15 pm.  If you come after that time, please follow the directions below to The Underground Centre:
  • Exit Holloway Road underground station and turn right
  • Start walking down Holloway Road towards Highbury & Islington
  • Take the third road on your right -  George’s Road 
  • Walk to the end of George’s Road
  • At the end of George’s Road, turn right (on to Lough Road)
  • On your left there should be an estate. You will soon come to a basket ball court
  • The Underground Centre is to the left of the basketball court 

For the first meeting, there will be no steering group! 

In case you get lost on the day, call 07540261104. 

To recap:


Date: Tuesday 21st of October
The group will take place at: The Underground Centre, Piper Close, London, N7 8TQ
Time: 6.30 pm - 8.30 pm 


11 - 15 Youth Group 

The youth group for 11 to 15 year olds will run on the third Thursday of the month. This group is staying at the Tavistock Centre in Swiss Cottage. 

Look below to find information about the next youth group: 


Date: 16th October
Time: 5.30 -7.30pm
This group will take place at: Tavistock Centre,120 Belsize Lane, London, NW3 5BA (map

Group for Black, Asian and Ethnic Minority 13 - 25 Year olds

We have thought a lot about running an extra meet up opportunity for young People of Colour who identify as trans or non-binary or who are questioning their gender identity. Some of our regular members have expressed a desire to have a space to hold important discussions around race and ethnicity.

The sessions will be facilitated by Lynette Godard. Lynette Godard teaches undergraduates at Royal Holloway and identifies as non-binary. Lynette will be visiting us at the youth group session in September.

The sessions will run on: the third Friday of the month from 5.30 – 7.30pm.

The first session will be on: 17th October 5.30 -7.30pm.

This group will take place at:  The Roundhouse, Chalk Farm Road, London, NW1 8EH (map


Knowledge is Power: Non-Binary Workshop by Beyond the Binary 

The second workshop in the Knowledge is Power series is being run by the team behind new online magazine Beyond the Binary. Please see information below. 


Being Non-Binary: non-binary discussion group


Being Non-Binary is a workshop for young people to talk about their experiences and journeys as non-binary people. There will be a space to ask questions and bring up concerns and personal experiences about coming out (and how to explain it to parents/school/work), healthcare, barriers in wider society and trans spaces, and how language and representation positively and negatively affects us. The ultimate aim of the day is to create a resource to help non-binary people in the UK, covering what is talked about in the session. There will also be an opportunity to talk about a potential future event for non-binary people, affiliated with GI.

Date: Saturday 25th October 2014

Time: 2 pm - 5pm

Location: Royal Central School of Speech and Drama, Swiss Cottage (MAP)



L
eeds Youth Group for 13 - 25 Year Olds

The second youth group in Leeds takes place on the last Tuesday of the month. The next session will take place on:

Tuesday, 28th of September 
Time: 5.30 pm– 7.30 pm 
Location: Tavistock Leeds Base, 14 Park Square East, Leeds LS1 2LF (Map)


Flyer reads: CliniQ. Testing Times. Tackling transphobia, stigma and HIV. Trans populations are rarely taken into account in HIV research, and as a result we currently have no idea how many trans people are living with HIV in the UK. As trans people, we experience discrimination and stigma - but how does this intersect with the stigma of being HIV positive? An evening of short films and discussion presented by CliniQ. 6 to 8 PM on Wednesday, October 22nd, 2014. Email: David.Stuart@chelwest.nhs.uk

Flyer reads: CliniQ. Testing Times. Tackling transphobia, stigma and HIV. Trans populations are rarely taken into account in HIV research, and as a result we currently have no idea how many trans people are living with HIV in the UK. As trans people, we experience discrimination and stigma - but how does this intersect with the stigma of being HIV positive? An evening of short films and discussion presented by CliniQ. 6 to 8 PM on Wednesday, October 22nd, 2014. Email: David.Stuart@chelwest.nhs.uk

5 Things You Will Learn from Being Out as Trans at University

By Jesse Ashman 

Having come out in my first year of studying an undergraduate degree in English Literature, I am about to start a new university for the second time – this time as postgraduate student, below are some things I learnt from the first time at university.

SONY DSC

  1. You are not alone

While it seems statistically unlikely, there are other trans people at university. I might have been extremely lucky, but I had a small support-cluster of trans friends on campus. There is, of course, no way to find out if you have a potential trans comrade without being very rude (asking if someone is trans is rude, and does not help with making friends). This extends into professional academia as well. I’ve found, especially when dealing with queer theory, you will start using more and more texts by trans academics; it isn’t just my generation of trans people in higher education, others have walked this path before. This also isn’t just confined to the arts; I particularly recommend Evolution’s Rainbow, by Joan Roughgarden, who is a biologist and a trans woman. For me, it’s comforting to know that if you do get to the higher circles of academia there will be others there who too have had to go through explaining things like ‘my pronouns are actually…’ and ‘the gender is wrong on my passport because…’ which brings me on to…

  1. People will surprise you

It’s nice to have other trans people to talk to, but it’s also good to bear in mind that people outside of the community will surprise you. If you do choose to disclose your trans status, I’ve found that you can never assume who will be understanding and who won’t. Some of the most supportive people of my experience as a trans student have been people who I would never have guessed before coming to university would be. I especially remember one member of staff was extremely passionate about the injustice of me not feeling comfortable taking part in a conference because it would mean being put in single-sex accommodation. The overwhelming majority of people, especially proper-adult people who have had more years or more life experience or both in order to become educated on trans issues, were understanding and used the correct pronouns after having been corrected a minimum of once. That being said, doesn’t just apply to people already informed on trans issues. During my time at university I found myself explaining my trans status to a hall full of boisterous high-school students – after having clumsily explained in what I thought were the simplest terms possible, the reply came back from one of the particularly loud members of the pre-pubescent audience; ‘fair enough.’

  1. You will study texts that completely ignore your existenceSONY DSC

You can explain the existence of trans people to an IRL (IRL = In Real Life, for any non-digital natives reading) person, no amount of careful explaining to a hardbound copy of Freud’s essays on sexuality will change its mind about the development of gender. As soon as you go into any reading about gender a trans person will find many texts that ignore or misunderstand their existence; erasing it or using it as an ‘extreme example’ of gender variance or worse, by implying that the existence of trans people infringes upon women’s rights. There is no easy solution for this, the only partial remedy I can offer is to write your own opinions, challenge tutors who portray outdated theories in a positive light and try to use any salvageable elements of texts like this. It is unfortunate that it’s almost impossible not to encounter academic articles and books that have no understanding, consideration or a negative view of the trans community and it’s important to bear in mind that this does not represent the view of most people. Especially now, and especially after someone has undergone a little education on trans issues – most people have prejudices based on misunderstanding and not on hate.

  1. It is Okay to challenge the institutionSONY DSC

Bearing this in mind, this goes not just for trans issues, and is definitely something that all students should be made aware of ; it’s okay to challenge the institution (the institution being academia, the university system and established knowledge). Being at university means you’re part of the academic community now – and anyone who tries to tell you otherwise, to imply that your opinion is less valued based on your age or position as an undergraduate, is a self-aggrandising moron. It’s perfectly okay to point out when a text ignores or contradicts your existence or when you disagree for any other reason. And it’s certainly perfectly okay to point out when a staff member makes a mistake when talking about gender, either as a general concept and especially when they’re talking about your own gender.

One of the problems I regularly encountered on a course made almost entirely of women was seminar leaders jovially pointing out ‘there’s only X amount of boys in the class!’ – the tally was always one short and a lot of apologies were made. Just because someone is an authority figure does not mean they won’t concede when they are wrong, and any member of staff who doesn’t should not be involved in teaching, or in academia. University is about broadening horizons and collective knowledge, not an established knowledge being passed down from on high by the doctors and professors of the university. (Although one piece of information I would like them to pass down is what actually is the difference between a professor and a doctor except that one makes me think of the bird from Bagpuss). It is often difficult to be assertive when you know or suspect authority figures to be wrong, but you should challenge them whenever you are able.

  1. There will be bad days

And lastly this one almost goes without saying – there will be bad days. There will be days when you feel entirely alone, when you feel like there is no one in the institution who would even scrape the tip of the iceberg of understanding trans experience and as if every piece of study was designed without you in mind. The best thing to remember is that this is natural, and this is okay. I haven’t met a single student, trans or otherwise, who hasn’t had bad days. It doesn’t mean you’re not strong enough to get through a degree, and it doesn’t mean there aren’t good days to come – and this is the most valuable piece of information I learnt as an undergraduate and if I was to choose one thing to pass down to my first-year self it would be that bad days are okay. So okay in fact that despite the bad days I chose to start it all over again within few months of graduating.

Jesse is an English literature graduate and aquatic snail enthusiast from Essex. He graduated from Queen Mary, University of London and is currently studying for an MA in Sexual Dissidence at the University of Sussex. 

Follow him on Twitter: @JesseAshman 

Illustrations by Jesse Ashman

Stop Our Silence: Gender-based bullying in education survey

In the run up to our Stop Our Silence campaign, we are carrying out research around gender-based bullying in educational settings. We are collecting stories from anyone who has been bullied on the grounds of gender expression or based on perceptions of their sexual orientation or gender identity at school, college or university.

We are accepting responses from anyone who has experience gender/sexuality based bullying because we’re aware of the way bullying often transpires.

We believe that bullies often assume and target individuals who do not conform to gender norms. Quite often not conforming to gender norms leads to assumptions about sexuality. For example, someone who is read as a boy and is considered “too feminine” by a bully may be harassed for being gay. 

You don’t have to identify as transgender or LGB in order to be the target of gender or sexuality based bullying. If you have been the target of either or both, we would like to hear your responses and your story.

Please take a moment to complete our survey. A link can be found here

 

Edge Fund

Thanks so much to those of you who have helped to spread the word about our fundraising appeal. We are 15 days in and have raised just under £4,000. Over the next month we’d love to get this closer to £20,000. The funds raised will be added to the pot for this funding round, so the more we raise the more we can help you!

One thing which could really help us raise more is to be able to use some of your words. For example, perhaps first hand accounts of how hard it is working at grassroots level to bring about radical social change - being overshadowed by larger groups, loss of free or low cost places to meet, relying on volunteers, difficulty in raising funds etc. Or perhaps you have something to say about the injustices you face, the world you’re trying to create or why it’s important to support grassroots groups? 

I’m sorry to ask for your help with this, but we are a very small fund and unless we can raise more money for this round we’ll only be able to help about 30 of the 336 groups that applied. We’d like to do better than that. If you can spare a few minutes to send a couple of sentences we’d really appreciate it. 

You can see the crowdfund here:
http://gogetfunding.com/project/grassroots-action-for-radical-change

Edge Fund - Please donate!

Only 30 of the 336 groups that applied will be funded as part of the Edge Fund this round. They would like to do better than that. PLEASE DONATE: 

http://gogetfunding.com/project/grassroots-action-for-radical-change

LGBT Activity Day at the British Museum

Sunday 5th October 2014 – 11:30am – 5:30pm

Join us for a day aimed at our LGBT communities and their allies. See one of our films on the theme of ageing. Hear from the first British transgendered person to be featured in a documentary on UK television. Be one of very few people to handle REAL objects from the British Museum’s collections. Inspired? Check out the schedule below. ALL WELCOME.

here is a Facebook link please share

https://www.facebook.com/events/1565592243669568/?ref=22 -  

11.30-12.45 object handling session

Includes introduction to the Museum’s collections and provides informal training on the exploration of objects and their cultural meanings. Gives you the chance to make connections and tell stories around real objects. To book a place please email nigel.harris@camdenlgbtforum.org.uk or call Camden LGBT Forum on 020 7388 5720 and we will confirm with joining instructions. The event is free but places are limited to 30 so please get in touch soon.

12.45-13.30 lunch

13.30-14.00 Beauty Before Age (1997 Dir. Johnny Symons) followed by 14.10-15.10 Q&A with Julia Grant and Stuart Lorimer*

Film documentary provides reflections on growing older. Gay men of different ages ponder what it means to get older in a culture that is youth obsessed. In 1979 Julia Grant became a household name when she featured in the BBC’s ground-breaking documentary ‘A Change of Sex’. 40 years later – what has changed? Julia will be joined by Stuart Lorimer, Consultant Psychiatrist and Gender Specialist at Charing Cross Hospital to explore this question.

15.20-17.30 Les Invisibles (2012 Dir. Sebastien Lifshitz)*

Several elderly gay and bisexual men and women speak frankly about their pioneering lives, their fearless decision to live openly in France at a time when society rejected them.

Please note that Beauty Before Age with Q and A and Les Invisibles require two separate tickets. Tickets are FREE but booking essential from the British Museum’s box office on 020 7323 8181 or online athttp://www.britishmuseum.org/whats_on/events_calendar.aspx. For the Q and A see separate joining notes above.

Camden LGBT Forum and the British Museum look forward to welcoming you on our activity day!

www.camdenlgbtforum.org.uk

Opportunity for young people at London Transport Museum

Background

We will be running a fun and exhilarating 7 week project to support young people to collaboratively create and deliver a fantastic performance piece for our *Museum Friday Late event (November 28th http://www.ltmuseum.co.uk/whats-on/events-calendar/friday-lates)

*Museum Friday Lates are entertaining, 18+ events that take place 6 times a year. The Museum is transformed into a space for an older audience to engage with our collection through a menu of workshops and happenings.

Our November Late is themed on stories around Night Buses in London. We want enthusiastic and imaginative 18-25 year olds with a love of performance and story-telling to take our audiences on an exciting journey through the streets of London inspired by the Night Bus.

Through this we hope to make the museum more accessible to young people. We want to inspire them, through this project and our collection, to visit us and other museums with confidence and to use them as learning resources.

What’s in it for them?

  • ·         The chance help shape the programme, creating a thrilling performance for Museum Late attendees.
  • ·         The chance to collaboratively devise and perform your story at the Friday Late.
  • ·         Training in presentation, audience engagement and storytelling.
  • ·         New skills, work experience and volunteer hours for their CVs
  • ·         An optional Arts Award qualification
  • ·         We will reimburse travel and provide refreshments

Who can take part?

Anyone between 18 & 25 can be a part of this project; though it would especially suit those involved or interested in Performing Arts/ Storytelling/ Creative writing.

We would love to hear from enthusiastic young people with the ability to come up with fresh ideas and to collaborate openly with other young people and museum staff.

If you know of any young people that would be interested in such an opportunity, please do share the details with them!

Important dates and timings

  • ·         Taster evening: Thursday 9th October
  • ·         Time Period: 13 October – 5 December 2014
  • ·         Volunteer Hours: 2 evenings a week (We are flexible as to which evenings these will be)

**To book onto the taster evening please contact us with your name, age and contact details atyoungpeople@ltmuseum.co.uk or call Journey’s Volunteers on 020 7565 7446

TAGS: New Transgender & Gender Non-conforming Swimming Group in London!
 
tags
 
Let me introduce you to TAGS - London trans and gender non-conforming swimming group. I started this group a couple of weeks ago, not initially as a follow up to any other trans* swimming group. But thanks to Brighton and Hove swimmers from Trans Swimming Brighton for your support in giving me ideas. The initiative came about after I was misgendered by council staff in south London and requested information on facilities provided to our community. I posted on Facebook to gauge interest and was quite pleased with the response I got. With the support of Chryssy D Hunter and Alec Scott Rook, we quickly set up a Facebook Page and started to post our idea.  I then made contact with Fusion (who run leisure centres in Lewisham) and Lewisham Council and eventually got agreement to a meeting. Well, I have to say what we have been offered is fantastic. We couldn’t ask for better facilities. Please check out London Trans and Gender Non-conforming Swimming Group. You will be bowled over by what TAGS has been offered. The space will not only provide a safe space to swim but a meeting place to share ideas and network and gain support. Please come along and support us. We are on a three month trial but if we can get the numbers the trial will be extended. The facilities are amazing, the only thing were short of is a slide. But you never know. Check out our FB page for information on the event. The first night is Friday October the 3rd at 8.30 pm at Glassmill Leisure Centre, Lewisham.
 
 Roberta Francis - Gendered Intelligence volunteer and founder of TAGS