Are you interested in the media?

At GI, we’re often talking about how trans people are portrayed in the media. In fact, we receive several requests per month from journalists and filmmakers who want to write about or film young trans and non-binary people for a range of newspapers, magazines and production companies.

We thought it might be a good idea to bring together young trans people, GI volunteers and  trans professionals interested in the media to think about how we deal with these requests. 

The group will set up some loose guidelines for how GI deals with media enquiries that concern us, as well as think about the sort of media content we want to see about  trans people, and young people in particular. There might even be the opportunity to create our own! 

Occasionally, the group might put a call out for those who want to be involved in media coverage. Even if it’s not something you’re interested in, you still have the chance to learn about how journalists put together stories and gain a better understanding of how the media works. 

Discussions will mainly be online, so don’t worry if you’re not London-based.

If you would like to be involved or would like to know more, please fill in this form:

puffball

Families Picnic at Primrose Hill

When: Saturday 30th August 2-5pm (meet 1.30pm at CSSD) 

Where: Entrance from Elseworthy Terrace (Map)

To celebrate the end of the summer, we will be having a lovely families’ picnic for all trans youth and their SOFFAs (significant others, families, friends and allies).  We will meet at 1.30pm at the regular spot of outside Central School of Speech & Drama, and we will walk down to Primrose Hill.  For those who wish to make their own way there we will be near the Elseworthy Terrace entrance.  

ALL ARE WELCOME.
 
Bring something to add to the picnic for us all to share - healthy food welcome! And once our food has digested we will embark on a game of rounders for those who are up for it. Hurrah! Let’s hope for nice weather. There’s no Plan B! 
  

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[Image Reads: Human Right Here and Now. Young People’s Project 2014.]
Do you know young people interested in human rights?Manchester 5 August / London 13 August  10.30-3.30
 
Please spread the word about our exciting pop up events in Manchester on 5 August and London on 13 August. Hosted by the British Institute of Human Rights and supported by the Equality and Human Rights Commission, this series of events is an opportunity for young people to find out more about human rights and how they can get their voice heard. We have a small participation budget to support young people to attend, this can be used to cover travel or other costs young people might need to cover in order to come along on the day. What are we doing at the events? We have an action packed agenda including a session on human rights history, a crash course in human rights law, a real life look at how our human rights law protectsyoung people’s rights, and a debate about how young people can get involved and get their voice heard on the issues that matter to them. Young people will get a chance to try out a new set of resources about young people’s human rights and tell us what they would like them to say. There will also be the opportunity to tell us what other info and support young people need to help them find out more about their rights and have their voice heard. Don’t worry it won’t be boring! We’ve got games, prizes, discussions and debates, video and some creative elements and a brilliant graphic facilitator who will draw the event as it happens! Who should attend? The events are open to 11-18 year olds from across England and Wales. Young people can come along individually, with friends, or book on as part of a group. To book a place please on the Manchester event please visit http://manchesterhumanrights.eventbrite.co.uk or to book on to the London even please visithttps://londonhumanrights.eventbrite.co.uk Please contact Sophie on showes@bihr.org.uk or call 0207 882 5853 if you would like to book a group of places for young people. Please also contact Sophie to discuss participation costs we can cover. We are committed to making the event accessible and inclusive. Please get in touch if the young people you work with need any additional support to attend this event.

[Image Reads: Human Right Here and Now. Young People’s Project 2014.]

Do you know young people interested in human rights?

Manchester 5 August / London 13 August  10.30-3.30
 
Please spread the word about our exciting pop up events in Manchester on 5 August and London on 13 August. Hosted by the British Institute of Human Rights and supported by the Equality and Human Rights Commission, this series of events is an opportunity for young people to find out more about human rights and how they can get their voice heard. We have a small participation budget to support young people to attend, this can be used to cover travel or other costs young people might need to cover in order to come along on the day.
 
What are we doing at the events? 
We have an action packed agenda including a session on human rights history, a crash course in human rights law, a real life look at how our human rights law protectsyoung people’s rights, and a debate about how young people can get involved and get their voice heard on the issues that matter to them.
 
Young people will get a chance to try out a new set of resources about young people’s human rights and tell us what they would like them to say. There will also be the opportunity to tell us what other info and support young people need to help them find out more about their rights and have their voice heard.
 
Don’t worry it won’t be boring! We’ve got games, prizes, discussions and debates, video and some creative elements and a brilliant graphic facilitator who will draw the event as it happens!
 
Who should attend? 
The events are open to 11-18 year olds from across England and Wales. Young people can come along individually, with friends, or book on as part of a group. To book a place please on the Manchester event please visit 
http://manchesterhumanrights.eventbrite.co.uk or to book on to the London even please visithttps://londonhumanrights.eventbrite.co.uk
 
Please contact Sophie on showes@bihr.org.uk or call 0207 882 5853 if you would like to book a group of places for young people. Please also contact Sophie to discuss participation costs we can cover.
 
We are committed to making the event accessible and inclusive. Please get in touch if the young people you work with need any additional support to attend this event.
EHRC: Gender segregation is discrimination

So why does the EHRC agree to exemptions?
 
London, UK - Huffington Post - READ & COMMENT: http://huff.to/1uhLSUh
 
Guest blogger Chris Moos writes:

Seven months after the controversy surrounding the publication of Universities UK’s guidelines legitimising gender segregation, the Equalities and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) has now ruled that gender segregation is - generally - unlawful. The verdict of the commission could not be clearer:
 
"Gender segregation is not permitted in any academic meetings or at events, lectures or meetings provided for students, or at events attended by members of the public or employees of the university or the students’ union."
 
Overall, this is a great victory for the broad coalition of campaigners against gender segregation, which includes renowned women’s rights activists like Maryam Namazie, Pragna Patel, Sara Khan, and Yasmin Alibhai-Brown, and has found broad support across the political spectrum. More than anything, the EHRC’s decision is not only a slap in the face of the vocal Islamist supporters of segregation such as the Federation of Islamic Student Societies (FOSIS), the Islamic Education and Research Academy (iERA) and Hizb-ut Tahrir, but also of social and Christian conservatives as well as some parts of the Left who are happy to relativise discrimination whenever it serves their agenda.
 
The EHRC has nevertheless thrown out of the window all the usual arguments of those detractors, including that segregation is a ‘religious right’ whose denial amounts to discrimination, that ‘voluntary’ segregation can be reasonably practised in an educational setting, that the provision of a ‘mixed’ seating area makes segregation somehow less discriminatory, and of course the ‘toilet argument’.
 
The catch
 
However, as usual, the catch is in the fine print. Reading further into the document, one can find several worrying exemptions that rather than discourage discrimination, will give those who want to undermine equality principles a helping hand in maintaining segregation.
 
The first is that “equality law does not apply to religious worship”. Thus, “a religious student society or association may organise a gender segregated event, for the duration of any religious service.” Although the EHRC recommends that universities “prohibit gender segregation at all meetings which go beyond acts of religious worship or practice”, this puts universities in the role of arbiters of theological doctrine and will hence be impossible to control. Already now, Islamic Student Societies are claiming that ‘Muslim meetings’ (whatever the actual topic) are essentially religious worship, allowing them to segregate. Given the range of exemptions that follows, there are indeed many ways the EHRC’s ruling can be interpreted. For example, the EHRC considers that associations can
 
"restrict their membership to those who share a protected characteristic, including gender or religion or belief. A female-only association may restrict access to a benefit, facility or service to female associates and may restrict guest invitations to women. (This exception also applies to religious associations as described below.) Thus universities and students’ unions can lawfully permit associations which are established for a single sex or for a particular religious community to use university facilities and advertise their events through university channels."
 
It is an established characteristic of equality law that associations are able to restrict their memberships to those who share protected characteristics. However, in this case, this opens an avenue for subverting the principle of equality through gender segregation in the guise of having ‘female-only’ or ‘male-only’ facilities, services or memberships. This has already been a common practice on some campuses, where different societies (e.g. ‘brothers society’ or ‘sisters society’) offer services and events to males or females only, thereby effectively maintaining gender segregation and further cementing the gender divisions within faith groups.
 
This will work whenever segregationists can claim that they are delivering “services relating to religion in premises used for religious purposes”. Admittedly, depending on the scope of the exemption, this might not have much practical relevance. But any exemption, if not clearly and narrowly defined, risks undermining the principle at stake. Unsurprisingly, this is also the case here, where ‘religious purposes’ are defined as
 
"practising or advancing the religion, teaching religious practice or principles; enabling followers to receive benefits or engage in activities within the framework of that religion; or fostering or maintaining good relations between those of different religions. For the exception to apply, it must be necessary to provide such services separately or only to persons of one sex, in order to comply with religious doctrines, or to avoid conflicting with the convictions of a significant number of the religion’s followers."
 
This implies that only by defining a meeting or event as religious in character, even if only taking place in ‘temporarily occupied premises’, for example a lecture theatre, the organiser is relieved of the equality duty. As it stands, anything from merely talking about ‘religious practice or principles’ or ‘engaging with the framework of the religion’, or even a simple interfaith gathering falls in that category.
 
Thus, what is nothing but effective gender segregation is not unlawful, as long as the organiser can argue that it is “necessary to avoid conflicting with the convictions of a significant number of the religion’s followers”, thereby opening the door for small groups of ultra-conservatives to define what is permissible for the majority. Evidence for what happens when so-called ‘conflicts of convictions’ break loose within a religious community is plentiful, with the most extreme and aggressive voices dominating the tone of the debate, thereby sidelining those who work hard to reconcile their religious convictions with equality principles, especially women and LGBTQs.
 
Most concerningly, religious organisations can also restrict membership on the basis of religion, belief or even sexual orientation:
 
"Non-commercial religious organisations when undertaking defined religious activities are also permitted to restrict their membership and the use of their premises on the basis of religion or belief or sexual orientation, subject to satisfying certain conditions. […] They can also restrict both participation in their activities (whether on or off their premises) and also access to the goods, facilities and services that they supply to individuals of the same religion and belief subject to the same conditions."
 
Interpreted narrowly, as it undoubtedly will be, this would mean that a religious student society is able to set the premise that they are, for example, for ‘true Christians’ or ‘true Muslims’ only, and then define what “Christians” or “Muslims” really are, restricting access, services and membership to only those they consider to be of ‘genuine’ belief.
 
This is not a theoretical point. Of course, what is ‘Christian’ or ‘Muslim’ really is up for debate, with many Protestants not accepting Catholics as Christians (or vice versa), and some Sunni Muslims not accepting Shias, Ahmadiyyas or Alevites as 'true' Muslims, as it is reportedly also customary in some British universities like Queen Mary or Imperial.
 
Most worryingly, this includes exemptions on the basis of sexual orientation, leading to a situation where religious student societies could potentially deny gay students for instance access to prayer rooms based on their sexual orientation.
 
The ideology of ‘multi-faithism’
 
The EHRC - although undoubtedly restricted by the legal framework - has thus produced an inconsistent and contradictory document that gives leeway for interpretation that the proponents of gender, sexual and religious segregation will readily be able to exploit. Of course, the legal situation in the UK is not the responsibility of the EHRC, but the outcome of a political process that, according to Pragna Patel, has culminated in the “use of religion as the main basis for social identity and mobilisation”. Welcome to the world of “multi-faithism”.
 
Few commentators seem to see the deep irony of a prime minister who publicly condemns religious gender segregation, yet explicitly rejects state neutrality in faith matters and prides himself in running the ‘most pro-faith government in the West’. Unsurprisingly, the numerous hardline religious organisations that have everything on their minds but equality are deeply grateful for so much assistance with their sectarian agenda.
 
With this inherently incongruous ruling of the EHRC, we are likely to see not less, but more gender segregation at universities. As has become apparent in recent months, this issue is also far from restricted to higher education. Those who suffer most will be - mainly religious - students who are already struggling to defend their need for equality in the face of increasingly vociferous demands from self-appointed or government courted ‘community leaders’.
 
Rather than extending a helping hand to further legitimise religious exemptions from equality legislation through interpreting the law, the Equality and Human Rights Commission should have remained true to its founding principles and denounced a legislation that propagates equality in principle, but all but equality once the term ‘religion’ is thrown in. Equality is a human right that cannot be ‘exempted away’ - especially when this means providing cover for the multi-faithist ideology of a political class that is so much about faith and so little about basic human rights, including the right to practice one’s religion without being subject to gender discrimination.

Manchester SOFFAs Meeting

MORF Members and others, would your friends/family like to meet other SOFFAs? Let them know about Me & T! 

Me & T is a group open for any SOFFAs (significant others, friends, family, allies) who feel they need or can give support on experiences with transition/gender dysphoria.

Caroline and Rebecca will be on hand to facilitate the first meetings and see what members would like to cover in the future.

The groups is free to attend and there will be tea & coffee (and possibly cake).

Any questions please email: me.and.t.manchester@gmail.com

Next Meetings:

2nd September 2014:  19:30-21:00: Lesbian and Gay foundation: The
Meeting Room (second floor)

7th October 2014: 19:30-21:00: Lesbian and Gay foundation:  The
Meeting Room (second floor)

4th November 2014: 19:30-21:00: Lesbian and Gay foundation:  The
Meeting Room (second floor)

Look forward to seeing you there!
Caroline and Rebecca,
me.and.t.manchester@gmail.com

Equality and Religious Freedom in a Changing World

The 2014 Cutting Edge Consortium Conference ‘Equality and Religious Freedom in a Changing World’   will take place on Saturday 1st November 2014 from 10am- 5pm (registration from 9.30am) at Conway Hall, 25 Red Lion Square WCIR 4RL.

Booking is now open online via the CEC Website www.cuttingedgeconsortium.co.uk  andwww.ticketsource.co.uk/date/95707.

A full programme will be published shortly on the website. See the attached flyer for preliminary details of speakers including prominent LGBT campaigners, trade unionists, lawyers and academics as well as politicians and representatives from faith communities.

There will be two plenary sessions, one focusing on the international context of faith based homophobia, biphobia and transphobia, and the other focusing on the changing nature of LGBT activism in the UK. We will also have a panel session on the current political situation for LGBT rights in the UK and worldwide.

Note an early bird discount is available until 7th September. Book online now! You can also order your ticket by emailing us at cuttingedgeconsortium1@googlemail.com

The Wotever DIY Film Festival is a celebration of queer, lo-fi filmmaking in all its handmade genius. It’s our third year and we are bigger than ever, with dozens of films, talks and events from established directors to first time newbies - proving you don’t need a million pounds to make a great film. This year’s event will be at the beautiful Cinema Museum in Kennington and the Royal Vauxhall Tavern, Vauxhall between the 30th August-2nd September.
We are part of Wotever World, a queer arts, performance and activism collective. 
[Flyer Reads: Wotever DIY Film Fest 2004. August 30th to September 2nd.]

The Wotever DIY Film Festival is a celebration of queer, lo-fi filmmaking in all its handmade genius. It’s our third year and we are bigger than ever, with dozens of films, talks and events from established directors to first time newbies - proving you don’t need a million pounds to make a great film. This year’s event will be at the beautiful Cinema Museum in Kennington and the Royal Vauxhall Tavern, Vauxhall between the 30th August-2nd September.

We are part of Wotever World, a queer arts, performance and activism collective. 

[Flyer Reads: Wotever DIY Film Fest 2004. August 30th to September 2nd.]

Public Health England (PHE) have commissioned the National LGB&T Partnership to create some information ‘fact’ sheets about how to stay healthy for members of the trans and non-binary community. Its primary aim is to inform and educate trans and non-binary people and empower them to improve their own health and wellbeing. 

We are looking for some energetic and enthused young people to get involved! 

Gendered Intelligence have been asked to consult with some of the younger members of this community to hear from you about what kind of information you would like to have at your finger tips in order to stay healthy. 

We have set up a focus group and wish to invite any person from the ages of 13 - 25 who identify themselves as trans, non-binary or are questioning their gender identity. 

The focus group will take place on:

Saturday 9th August
2.30pm - 4pm
at: Central School of Speeh & Drama, Swiss Cottage, NW3 3HY

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO ATTEND PLEASE COMPLETE THIS SHORT FORM

If you have any queries: email admin@genderedintelligence.co.uk 
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Alex Salmond: exclusive interview on LGBTI rights 
 
One Scotland campaign launched with pledge of LGBTI equality
 
Scottish leader makes more unprecedented pro-LGBTI statements
 
Glasgow, Scotland - 29 July 2014
 
 
The Scottish government has launched a blizzard of equality initiatives. Coinciding with the Commonwealth Games in Glasgow, they are being interpreted as an attempt to send a signal to the 80% of Commonwealth countries where discrimination is rife.
 
The leader of the Scottish government, First Minister Alex Salmond, has made further pro- lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) statements during a visit to Pride House in Glasgow, where he also warmly embraced same-sex parents and their children.
 
His support for LGBTI equality comes in the midst of the Commonwealth Games, which his government is hosting. It is being seen as an implied rebuke to the homophobic policies of 42 of the 53 Commonwealth member states and tacit support for LGBTI communities in these countries.
 
Salmond’s government has also this week launched the One Scotland campaign, with its Equal Scotland theme and high-profile billboards across the country:
http://www.onescotland.org 
 
The campaign includes commitments to equality based on age, disability, gender, race, religion or belief - and sexual orientation, gender identity and intersex status:
http://onescotland.org/equality-themes/lgbti
 
In an exclusive video interview with the new Scottish news and community website, KaleidoScot, Salmond reiterated his government’s commitment to LGBTI equality.
 
Watch the interview and comment: http://bit.ly/ks00020
 
Salmond’s recent statements follow a personal appeal for him to speak out against homophobia during the Commonwealth Games, made by Peter Tatchell:
http://bit.ly/1jXDeWI and http://ind.pn/1rWTpok
 
'It is amazing and praiseworthy that the Scottish government has consciously launched its pro-equality One Scotland campaign in the middle of the Commonwealth Games, with billboards everywhere so that visitors from across the Commonwealth get the message,” said Peter Tatchell, Director of the human rights organisation, the Peter Tatchell Foundation.
 
“This sends an implicit rebuke to the 42 Commonwealth countries that do not treat their LGBTI citizens equally. It signals to LGBTI people throughout the Commonwealth that Glasgow 2014 and the Scottish government are on their side. I can think of no other Commonwealth or Olympic Games host government that has done anything comparable.
 
“When the Peter Tatchell Foundation made its appeal to Alex Salmond last week we had no idea whether he and his government would respond. In fact, they’ve exceeded our request and expectations. Alex Salmond is flying the rainbow flag from government headquarters. He’s funded and visited Pride House in Glasgow and embraced same-sex parents and their children. There was a same-sex kiss during the Commonwealth Games opening ceremony, which was televised to tens of millions of people across the member states. Salmond has committed the Scottish government to support LGBTI rights in Scotland and worldwide. His government has now launched the high profile, all-inclusive One Scotland campaign with its Equal Scotland theme. I wish the UK and other governments would do the same.
 
"Whatever people think about Alex Salmond and the push for Scottish independence, his statement and actions are the most forthright and supportive on LGBTI equality by any leader of any host nation during a major international sporting event.
 
"No other leader of a Commonwealth or Olympic Games host nation has ever said or done anything so positive. Neither David Cameron nor Boris Johnson did anything similar during the London 2012 Olympics. To fly the rainbow flag from government headquarters for the duration of the Games is unprecedented. It sends a message of solidarity to LGBTI people throughout the Commonwealth. This is a unique, unprecedented initiative for which Alex Salmond and the Scottish government deserve full credit and praise.
 
“I applaud Alex Salmond for making such a strong, affirmative commitment to the human rights of LGBTI people throughout the Commonwealth. For LGBTI communities in the 42 Commonwealth countries where homosexuality is still criminalised, this is a significant gesture of solidarity. It will comfort them and, I hope, discomfort their homophobic governments. It demonstrates the Scottish government’s commitment to a truly equal and inclusive Games.
 
"It’s great that the Scottish government is flying the rainbow flag from it’s headquarters for the duration of the Games. This is a simple but important gesture and act of solidarity with the millions of LGBTI people who still suffer criminalisation, discrimination and mob violence in four out of five Commonwealth countries.
 
“Not even the London or UK governments managed to do this during the 2012 Olympics. Glasgow’s gone one better than London. I salute the Scottish government and Alex Salmond,” said Mr Tatchell.
 
Further information:
 
Peter Tatchell
Director, Peter Tatchell Foundation
0207 403 1790
Peter@PeterTatchellFoundation.org
www.PeterTatchellFoundation.org

Flyer Reads: Free Event. Kent and Medway LGBTQ Youth Summit 2014 via Kent Community Health NHS Trust. Stalls, Karaoke, Workshops. Lunch provided. Saturday. 13th of September. Kearsney Campsite. Dover. 12 to 7 PM. More details from: Hayley Rees on kcht.lgbtq@nhs.net or Fiona Thomson on 07538701802. Find us on Facebook. Facebook dot come slash Kent LGBTQ Hubs.

Flyer Reads: Free Event. Kent and Medway LGBTQ Youth Summit 2014 via Kent Community Health NHS Trust. Stalls, Karaoke, Workshops. Lunch provided. Saturday. 13th of September. Kearsney Campsite. Dover. 12 to 7 PM. More details from: Hayley Rees on kcht.lgbtq@nhs.net or Fiona Thomson on 07538701802. Find us on Facebook. Facebook dot come slash Kent LGBTQ Hubs.

CQC inspection may be of particular interest to trans patients

The Imperial College Healthcare Trust, which is to be inspected, is responsible for gender reassignment surgery at the Charing Cross Hospital.

Care Quality Commission inspection of Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust
The Care Quality Commission (CQC) will be inspecting this NHS Trust from the 2nd of September 2014, which includes Charing Cross, Hammersmith, Queen Charlotte’s and Chelsea, St. Mary’s and Western Eye Hospitals.

The inspection team is very interested to hear from anyone who has used services in the last 12 months about their experiences. The inspection team is also keen to hear evidence from local voluntary & community sector groups about the quality and safety of care that their members and service users have experienced. Please tell CQC about your experiences by Monday 28th July 2014.

You can send reports, peoples stories of care or other evidence your group holds about people’s care to enquiries@cqc.org.uk , by post to CQC, Citygate, Gallowgate, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 4PA, or you can ring CQC on 03000 616161. Please put the name of the service you are sending information about in the title to help CQC pass it to the right inspection team.

LGBT focus group on experiences of GP services

Patient and Public Voice in NHS England are running a series of focus groups,  and would like to run a specific LGBT focus group at Southside on the 27th August in the morning, the focus group would run for 2 hours and travel cost will be paid and all participants will receive a small gift pack for their attendance. The focus group will explore the experiences of GP services with a view to feeding these experiences into the development of some developmental standards for GPs across London.
 
interested participants should contact s.frater@nhs.net 

LGBT Role Models Within The NHS

Health Service Journal with the NHS Leadership Academy, will be publishing a special supplement in September exploring attitudes to, and experiences of, people who are lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender in the NHS.  To take part in the survey and to find out more …. read more
 

The survey is now open and we are seeking views – both from people who identify as LGBT and those who do not.